Monday, September 26, 2022

Back To Back Sinus Infections

How Is Sinus Infection Diagnosed

My Sinus Infections Keep Coming Back

Diagnosis depends on symptoms and requires an examination of the throat, nose and sinuses. Your allergist will look for:

  • Redness
  • Discolored nasal discharge
  • Bad Breath

If your sinus infection lasts longer than eight weeks, or if standard antibiotic treatment is not working, a sinus CT scan may help your allergist diagnose the problem. Your allergist may examine your nose or sinus openings. The exam uses a long, thin, flexible tube with a tiny camera and a light at one end that is inserted through the nose. It is not painful. Your allergist may give you a light anesthetic nasal spray to make you more comfortable.

Mucus cultures: If your sinus infection is chronic or has not improved after several rounds of antibiotics, a mucus culture may help to determine what is causing the infection. Most mucus samples are taken from the nose. However, it is sometimes necessary to get mucus directly from the sinuses.

Knowing what kind of bacteria is causing the infection can lead to more effective antibiotic therapy. A fungus could also cause your sinus infection. Confirming the presence of fungus is important. Fungal sinus infection needs to be treated with antifungal agents, rather than antibiotics. In addition, some forms of fungal sinus infection allergic fungal sinus infection, for example do not respond to antifungal agents and often require the use of oral steroids.

Is It Okay To Go To Work With A Sinus Infection

In many cases, it’s a judgment call on whether or not you should work with a sinus infection. You are likely to be fatigued and less productive, and it may be wiser to stay home, get some rest, and work from home if you can. Rest and hydration will allow you to get back to baseline faster, so you can return to work at full strength.

The only time you should definitely not go to work with a sinus infection is if you also have a fever. This may be a sign of something more contagious, as it isn’t very common with a sinus infection alone. If you’re suffering from a fever, do yourself a favor, and stay home to recover.

How Long Do Sinus Infections Last

Many variables affect the duration of sinus infections. Most last more than 10 days, but when a sinus infection lasts more than twelve weeks, it is considered chronic sinusitis.

If after 10 days, your symptoms have not improved, see your primary care doctor. You may have an acute sinus infection.If it lasts four weeks, you potentially have a sub-acute sinus infection that needs more aggressive treatment.

If symptoms last over 12 weeks, youre likely dealing with a chronic infection. After such prolonged symptoms, it can be difficult to distinguish sinus headaches from migraine headaches from severe allergies. After 12 weeks, diagnosing and treating the issue requires the medical expertise of an ENT.

Read Also: Can I Take 2 Advil Cold And Sinus

Pain Or Pressure In Your Sinuses

Facial pain is a common symptom of sinusitis. You have several different sinuses above and below your eyes, as well as behind your nose. Any of these air-filled cavities can hurt when you have a sinus infection.

Inflammation and swelling can cause your sinuses to ache with dull pressure. This is because inflammation may alter the typical path of mucus from the nose to the back of the throat.

You may feel pain in:

  • your forehead
  • on either side of your nose
  • in your upper jaws and teeth
  • between your eyes

This may lead to a headache. Headaches caused by sinus infections can occur where the sinuses are or in other places.

How Can I Prevent A Sinus Infection

Chronic Sinusitis Symptoms and Treatments

One of the best ways to prevent chronic sinusitis is to avoid the initial infection. Follow these tips:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for a least 20 seconds, especially when coming into contact with commonly used surfaces. If soap and water are not available, use a hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid anyone with a cold, flu or other respiratory illness.
  • Stop smoking or avoid secondhand smoke.

If you have a sinus infection, stay home, if you can. Remember to practice the following safety measure so that you avoid making others sick:

Read Also: Wisdom Teeth Sinus Pain Relief

How To Treat A Sinus Infection At Home

In the first two weeks of a sinus infection, patients may use saline sprays, over-the-counter steroid sprays like Flonase, and over-the-counter decongestants.

After 10 days, if the drainage is still colored, an antibiotic is likely necessary. Theres no homeopathic alternative to antibiotics. However, saline spray, topical steroid sprays, and decongestants work well with antibiotics to clear most infections.

Nasal Polyps Or Other Soft Tissue Obstructions

Sometimes, for reasons that are unclear, the thin tissue lining the nasal passages develop small, benign tumors. We call these nasal polyps. As you know, it does not take much to obstruct the airway, so even a single polyp can lead to significant airway and breathing issues including chronic snoring as well as recurring sinus infections. Most often though, people with polyp-related sinusitis have multiple polyps obstructing the nasal passages.

Fortunately, we can remove nasal polyps or other soft tissue obstructions using minimally-invasive procedures such as nasal airway remodeling.

Also Check: Best Allergy Medication For Sinus Headaches

Is It A Sinus Infection Or Cold

It can be difficult to tell the difference between a sinus infection and a cold as the symptoms can be very similar. Sinus infections often develop after a cold.

Sinusitis tends to last longer than a cold. Cold symptoms tend to get steadily worse, peaking at 35 days, then gradually get better. Sinus infections may last 10 days or more.

Some symptoms are more likely to be caused by sinusitis than a cold, including:

  • swelling of the tissue in the nose
  • green discharge from the nose
  • a swollen or tender face

Unlike a cold, sinusitis can become chronic, which means it lasts longer than eight weeks. Chronic sinusitis causes swelling and irritation in the sinuses and usually develops after a person has had acute sinusitis. Sometimes the symptoms go away and then come back again.

Ongoing sinus symptoms even if they get better and then come back may indicate chronic sinusitis.

Sinus infections often go away on their own without medical treatment. There are, however, some things a person can do at home to relieve the bothersome symptoms.

To treat sinusitis symptoms with home remedies , try:

Avoid using decongestants on a long-term basis without talking to a doctor first because they can make congestion worse if used for too long.

  • symptoms last longer than 10 days with no improvement
  • fever lasts longer than 3-4 days
  • the pain is very intense
  • a person with a suspected sinus infection has a drugs that suppress the immune system, or organ failure

Describing A Sinus Infection By Cause

India Fights Back : Post Covid Sinus Fungal Infection: How to manage | Episode – 285

Another way to describe a sinus infection is by what kind of germ causes it. Most sinus infections are caused by viruses, just like the common cold.

Viral sinus infections generally end on their own without any medical intervention. They usually only affect the upper respiratory system, with symptoms like runny nose, sore throat, facial pressure, congestion and headache.

But sometimes viral infections can turn into bacterial infections. Inflamed, blocked-off sinuses encourage the kind of moist, vulnerable environment where bacteria can thrive.

You might have a bacterial sinus infection if your symptoms linger beyond about a week. If your drainage turns yellow or green, that could mean your viral infection has turned bacterial.

Bacterial sinus infections typically need a little help from antibiotics to clear up.

Lastly, even though the vast majority of sinus infections are caused by viruses and bacteria, it is possible to have a sinus infection caused by a fungus. Most fungal sinus infections are caused by an allergic reaction to a fungus in the air, like black mold. This type is called allergic fungal sinusitis.

Another type of fungal sinus infection called invasive fungal sinusitis exists, but is extremely rare. People who are otherwise healthy dont get this infection. This type of infection is possible in severely immunocompromised people, such as those going through chemotherapy or with poorly controlled diabetes.

Don’t Miss: Sinus Tooth Pain One Side

What Causes Chronic Sinus Infection

Multiple factors acting together usually contribute to chronic sinusitis.

People with allergies are more prone to develop chronic sinusitis. About one in five people with chronic sinusitis also have asthma. This is because the linings of your nose and sinuses are in continuation with the linings of your lungs. These people are also likely to have nasal polyps .

A bacterial or viral infection can also trigger the condition. The infection is often low grade. The bacteria confine themselves in stubborn biofilms, making it difficult for your immune system or antibiotics to find and attack them.

An overlap of additional factors such as smoking, environmental pollutants, and deviated septum, further complicate the picture of chronic sinusitis.

It would be more appropriate to say that if youre already prone to allergies and nasal polyps, it becomes easier for harmful bugs, especially fungi to penetrate your sinuses. Likewise, a weak immune system makes you more susceptible to catch bacterial, viral, or fungal sinus infection.

A sinus that is inflamed and swollen can no longer sweep away the excess mucus and harmful agents due to the blockage of tiny hairs that facilitate this function.

Runny Nose And Postnasal Drip

When you have a sinus infection, you may need to blow your nose often because of nasal discharge, which can be cloudy, green, or yellow. This discharge comes from your infected sinuses and drains into your nasal passages.

The discharge may also bypass your nose and drain down the back of your throat. You may feel a tickle, an itch, or even a sore throat.

This is called postnasal drip, and it may cause you to cough at night when youre lying down to sleep, and in the morning after getting up. It may also cause your voice to sound hoarse.

Don’t Miss: What Medicine Helps A Sinus Infection

+ How To Get Smell And Taste Back Fast After Sinus Infection

15+ How to get smell and taste back fast after sinus infection

How to get smell and taste back fast after sinus infection. Your taste buds may rebound if you cut back on smoking and drinking alcohol, or as your tongue heals from a burn. The strong aroma of ginger enhances your sense of smell, while its flavor stimulates your taste by activating your taste buds. After much research, i recommend these targeted nutrients, smell therapy, and greatly reducing inflammatory foods in order to promote a return of smell and taste. Quitting can be difficult, but a.

Loss Of Taste And Smell Is It Covid-19 Or Something Else Beaumont Health From beaumont.org

If you are still suffering from these symptoms after. The best way to ensure that the integrity of your senses remains intact is to treat the root of the problem: For example, not being unable to smell something burning can be a health hazard, says brian danza, md, a uh rhinologist and sinus surgeon. The good news is, the majority of patients recover quickly, so this loss of taste and smell is temporary. Andrew ordon explains the tiktok trick may help to stimulate both your sense of smell and taste simultaneously and the combination of the citrus and sugar could lead to a reboot or reprogramming of your senses. You will need small bits of peeled ginger

Some Nasal Showers May Assume A Significant Part

Know In Details About The Symptoms, Causes And Treatment ...

The utilization of nasal splashes containing corticosteroids, like Nazonex or fluticasone, and oxymetazoline showers is likewise successful, however care should be taken that these showers should be utilized under a specialists management. At times, oral or injectable corticosteroids have likewise been demonstrated to be viable.

Don’t Miss: Does A Sinus Infection Require Antibiotics

How Can I Stop Recurring Sinus Infections

Treatment for chronic sinus infections should be discussed with a doctor, but can include:

Lifestyle changes â Quitting smoking and limiting your exposure to allergens and pollution is extremely important if you suffer from recurrent sinusitis. These risk factors are particularly damaging for those who have damaged mucus membranes from repeated sinus infections. Getting an in-home air purifier or certain indoor plants is one way to purify your air at home if moving cities is not an option.

Antibioticsâ Antibiotics are the first line of treatment for bacterial sinus infections. Bacterial sinus infections are typically diagnosed by the length of time youâve had symptoms without improvement. Bacterial sinus infections tend to last longer than viral infections. A doctor will prescribe you antibiotics after diagnosing your sinus infection as bacterial.

Home remediesâ When antibiotics and traditional methods have failed and you still suffer from frequent sinus infections, various home remedies exist with a lot of anecdotal, and in some case research-based, evidence to back them up. Essential oils in particular have been studied for antimicrobial properties, which may be powerful tools in solving the problem of recurrent infection.

Nasal wash â washing nasal passages with a large volume of saltwater using something called a neti pot is one method recommended in conventional and alternative treatments for sinusitis. This process is also known as sinus irrigation.

How To Get Rid Of Sinusitis

If you want to get rid of your sinusitis, you and your ENT will need to work together to discover the source of your sinus infections. For example, your sinusitis might always be precipitated by a cold, or you could have a deviated septum and sinusitis or sinusitis and sleep apnea. Regardless, finding the root cause behind your recurrent or prolonged sinusitis will help determine treatment.

Once the source of your sinus infections is found, you and your ENT will need to discuss treatment options. For those with recurrent sinus issues, one treatment, in particular, has proven itself effective again and again. That treatment option is balloon sinuplasty.

Balloon sinuplasty is a minimally invasive, in-office procedure that takes less than 20 minutes to perform and requires little to no recovery time.

You May Like: Emergency Room For Sinus Infection

Can I Prevent Sinusitis

There is no sure-fire way to prevent sinusitis. But there are some things that might help.

  • Donât smoke, and avoid other people’s smoke.
  • Wash your hands often, especially during cold and flu season, and try not to touch your face.
  • Stay away from things you know youâre allergic to. Talk to your doctor to see if you need prescription medicines, allergy shots, or other forms of immunotherapy.

If your sinus problems keep coming back, ask your doctor about the pros and cons of surgery to clean and drain the sinuses.

What Happens When A Sinus Infection Goes Untreated

Sinuses, Neck, Posture, McKenzie!

Although it may seem like it, your sinuses are not just contributing to your infections. They have many other functions like regulating air temperature, producing mucus to fight infections, and assist in communication. The sinuses are very important to your overall health and contribute to many different bodily functions.

Many sufferers are able to let their body clear up the infection on its own. They can suffer through their symptoms for a few days or even a week with only over-the-counter medication and feel better fairly soon. When sinus infections wonât seem to go away or continue to return, there may be a more serious problem going on. These particularly painful infections are known as chronic sinusitis and they need more attention and care than just over-the-counter medications.

Frequent sinus infections have been known to take a toll on all aspects of sufferersâ lives. When headaches, congestion, fatigue, facial pain, bad breath and much more continue, it can contribute to other serious issues such as:

  • Relationship problems
  • And much more

You May Like: Mucinex And Advil Cold And Sinus

How Is Sinusitis Spread

You can get it the same way you get cold and flu — by breathing it in or passing it from your hands to your mouth after touching something. Viruses get in the air after someone who is sick sneezes or coughs. They also can be passed on when someone shakes hands with someone who is sick or touches a doorknob or anything else the sick person has touched.

To keep from getting a virus, wash your hands often with soap and water. Try not to touch your eyes, nose, and mouth. Try to avoid people you have cold- and flu-like symptoms.

If you have sinusitis, cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze, and wash your hands to avoid making anyone sick.

Show Sources

Lingering Sinus Infection Or Chronic Runny Nose

A lingering sinus infection is different from a chronic runny nose. Chronic runny nose typically comes from allergies or other irritants in the air. However, this can turn into an infection over time.

When the sinuses become infected, the allergies, irritants, or viral cold have caused swelling in the nose thats blocked the drainage pathways. Consequently, fluid and mucous accumulate in the sinuses, where it has become infected with bacteria.

If youve been sick more than 10 days and begin to experience other symptoms like facial pressure, headache, and fever, youre dealing with more than a chronic runny nose.

Recommended Reading: Best Medication To Stop Sinus Drainage

When Antibiotics Are In Order

The main reason to prescribe antibiotics is for patient comfort, Dr. Sindwani says. The medical field used to be more convinced than it is today than untreated sinusitis would inevitably become a chronic issue, he says.

We dont think that way as much, he says. We dont know that an untreated acute sinusitis, if left untreated, will grumble along and cause people to have a chronic sinus infection.

Some people think thats two separate things, with chronic sinusitis more likely due to underlying issues like allergies or immune problems.

Popular Articles
Related news