Monday, September 26, 2022

Medication To Take For Sinus Infection

Pseudoephedrine And High Blood Pressure Interaction

Best Way to Diagnose a Sinus Infection

In 2005, a study showed that pseudoephedrine increased systolic blood pressure and heart rate, but had no effect on diastolic blood pressure.1 They also found that higher doses and immediate-release formulations of pseudoephedrine were associated with higher blood pressures.1 In addition, the study revealed that patients with well controlled hypertension had higher systolic and diastolic blood pressures after taking immediate release pseudoephedrine formulations.1

Can You Get Rid Of A Sinus Infection Without Antibiotics

Many sinus infections are caused by a virus like the common cold and do not require antibiotics for treatment. If you have mild symptoms, OTC medications may help relieve your symptoms until you feel better. However, consult your healthcare provider if symptoms worsen or do not improve after seven days, or if at any time you have intense/severe pain or pressure, or a high fever.

Which Specialties Of Doctors Treat Sinus Infections And Sinusitis

  • Sinusitis is often first diagnosed by a general practitioner, primary care physician, or internal medicine physician. A pediatrician may diagnose sinus infections in children.
  • If sinusitis is chronic or severe, you may be referred to an otolaryngologist, also called an ear, nose, and throat specialist . If your sinusitis is caused by allergies, you may be referred to an allergist.
  • If you experience an emergency due to your sinusitis, go to the Emergency Department at the nearest hospital.

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When To See A Doctor For Sinus Pain

If your sinus symptoms are not getting better with at-home treatments, and if your sinus symptoms last longer than seven to 10 days, you should see a doctor for treatment. Allina Health has many convenient care options for care, from online visits to walk-in care, to help you get better fast.

If you have frequent or reoccurring sinus infections, you may want to see an ear, nose and throat for your treatment options.

How Is Sinusitis Diagnosed

Sinus Infection Treatment: 10 Home Remedies

If you are experiencing pain and pressure that doesn’t clear up within a week to 10 days, it may be time to schedule a doctors appointment. You can visit your primary care physician to be evaluated for a sinus infection.

A sinus infection is usually diagnosed empirically without need for imaging or cultures, explains Lindsey Elmore, Pharm.D., BCPS. A simple medical exam and review of your symptoms should be enough for your doctor to identify a sinus infection. Your doctor will likely check your nose with a light to look for inflammation. He or she also may ask you about any pain youre feeling to see if it traces back to the sinus cavities.

In rare cases, or if you get frequent infections, your doctor may perform other tests to rule out other conditions like a fungal infection. This may include allergy testing, a nasal endoscopy to visually inspect the sinuses, swabbing your nose for a culture of nasal drainage, or lab imagery to scan for abnormalities.

Symptoms may be acute or chronic , and you should seek a doctors help if you have symptoms that last more than 10 days, or are unresolved with over the counter agents as this may be an indication that you have a bacterial sinus infection, says Dr. Elmore.

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Complications Of Chronic Sinusitis

Some people are troubled by frequent sinus infections, or continuous infection. Chronic sinusitis can linger for weeks or even months at a time. This can sometimes lead to serious complications, including infections in the bones and tissue near to the sinuses. Very rarely this infection can spread to the brain and the fluid around the brain. The person will be very ill and have swelling around the eyes.People with chronic sinusitis may have other problems which affect the nose, throat and ears at the same time, including:

  • Middle ear infection and temporary deafness
  • Post-nasal drip , which can lead to constant coughing, a sore throat and bad breath.

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Precautions To Take When Breastfeeding With Sinus Infection

The following precautions might help in preventing the transmission of sinus infection from the mother to the baby.

  • Wash your hands with soap and water before handling the baby and their personal items, such as toys and clothes.
  • Keep tissues handy to wipe your nose.
  • Use a sanitizer to clean your hands.
  • If the baby touches your face with his/her fingers, then clean the babys hands too.
  • Do not share the same utensils like the cup, glass, spoon, etc. with the baby.
  • Wear a mask while breastfeeding the baby.
  • Avoid kissing the baby until you are cured of the infection.

If you notice any symptoms in the baby, then see a pediatrician promptly.

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Tips For Choosing Suitable Medications

When at the pharmacy, a person should look for medications that do not contain decongestants or NSAIDs other than aspirin. A person should read the product label carefully and look at the active ingredients list. This is where drug manufacturers typically list the drugs and their effects.

A person should also avoid medications that are high in sodium. These ingredients can also increase a persons blood pressure.

Some medications, such as NSAIDs, have warning labels on the packaging. The warning is about how the medication may increase a persons blood pressure. People with hypertension or heart disease should avoid any medications that have this label.

Finally, if a person is not sure, they can ask the pharmacist or their doctor. They should mention any conditions they have, such as hypertension or heart disease, as well as any medications they are taking. The pharmacist or doctor will then outline which medications are safe for the person to take.

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Treatments For Sinus Infections Other Than Antibiotics

Alternative Medicine Herbal Remedies : How to Cure a Sinus Infection
#1: Saline Nasal Wash

Saline nasal wash can be a great way to thin out the mucous in the sinuses enough to clear out the blockage. I recommend starting this early on in the course of the illness to prevent the infection from worsening.

You can even make this at home using 2 cups of water and a 1/2 teaspoon of salt. I would add a 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of baking soda to prevent burning that can occur with use. There are also plenty of over the counter saline nasal sprays that you can purchase. You can use this 4-6 times per day.

#2: Vaporizer

Vaporizers are great because they can also thin out the mucous and make you feel a lot better. An easy home remedy, steam is probably the best way to use this treatment. Beware if you are an asthmatic as the steam could cause worsening of the asthma symptoms.

#3: Steroid Nasal Spray

Steroid nasal sprays such as Flonase have been my go to remedy recently and the great news is that they are now over the counter. The general recommendation is to use 1-2 sprays per nostril daily.

But I have found great relief using 2 sprays in each nostril twice daily. At these higher doses it is important to remember that you should use this short term, no more than 5-7 days.

These medications can significantly reduce inflammation allowing the congestion blockage to clear and significantly alleviate symptoms.

#4: Decongestants
#5: Guaifenesin

Guaifenesin such as Mucinex can certainly break up the mucous, allowing the congestion to clear more quickly.

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Which Antibiotics Are Most Effective For Bacterial Sinusitis

Antibiotics are indicated for sinusitis that is thought to be bacterial, including sinusitis that is severe or involves the frontal, ethmoid, or sphenoid sinuses, since this type of sinusitis is more prone to complications. Penicillins, cephalosporins, and macrolides seem to be equally efficacious. A 5- to 10-day regimen of amoxicillin 500 mg 3 times a day is recommended as first-line therapy.

One study suggests that a single dose of 2 g of extended-release azithromycin may be more effective than a 10-day course of amoxicillin/clavulanate. However, azithromycin is not likely a good choice in sinusitis because symptoms may improve only because of the anti-inflammatory efficacy of the agent and because it has poor efficacy against S pneumoniae and H influenzae. The risk of adverse effects should be weighed against the severity of disease and patient comorbidities prior to initiating antibiotic treatment.

Patterns of bacterial resistance should also be taken into account in the choice of antibiotic.

References
  • Lucas JW, Schiller JS, Benson V. Summary health statistics for U.S. adults: National Health Interview Survey, 2001. Vital Health Stat 10. 2004 Jan. 1-134. .

  • Slavin RG, Spector SL, Bernstein IL, Kaliner MA, Kennedy DW, Virant FS, et al. The diagnosis and management of sinusitis: a practice parameter update. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2005 Dec. 116:S13-47. . .

  • Lusk RP, Stankiewicz JA. Pediatric rhinosinusitis. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1997 Sep. 117:S53-7. .

  • Will I Need To Make Lifestyle Changes To Deal With Sinus Infections

    If you have indoor allergies it is recommended that you avoid triggersanimal dander and dust mites, for exampleas well as take medications. Smoking is never recommended, but if you do smoke, strongly consider a program to help you quit. Smoke can also trigger allergies and prevent removal of mucous by the nose. No special diet is required, but drinking extra fluids helps to thin nasal secretions.

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    What Causes Sinusitis

    Paranasal sinuses make mucous that drains out through your nose. Sometimes the lining of the sinuses become inflamed or infected. This usually happens after youve had an infection of your upper airways such as a cold, or when youve had hay fever or another allergy. Some people get sinusitis after every cold, while others get it rarely. Viral sinusitis is the most common cause for sinusitis. Bacterial or fungal infection is a much less common cause. Only 0.5% to 2% of cases are estimated to be complicated by a bacterial rhinosinusitis .

    Other things that can increase your risk of getting sinusitis include:

    • deviated nasal septum
    • changes in air pressure such as during an airplane flight or scuba diving
    • conditions that weaken your immune system such as chemotherapy treatment
    • ciliary dysmotility such as with cystic fibrosis or Kartageners syndrome.

    What Kicks It Off

    Medicine For Sinusitis

    With both sinusitis and allergies, your nose and sinuses get stuffed up, but it happens for different reasons.

    If you have allergies, the passages of your nose and sinuses swell because they’re trying to flush out “allergens.” That’s just a technical word for anything you’re allergic to, like pollen, mold, dust mites, and pet dander.

    Sinusitis usually develops because of allergies or a cold. Sometimes, but not often, it’s from bacteria that cause an infection.

    When you have allergies or a cold, your nose and sinuses get inflamed. That blocks mucus from draining, which can cause an infection — not to mention pain and pressure.

    If you have allergies, you’re more likely to have sinus problems. That’s because the inside of your nose and sinuses often swell up when you breathe in triggers.

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    Tips To Follow In Sinus Infection During Breastfeeding:

    Here are many to assist you to manage a sinus infection whereas you are breastfeeding.

    • Drink plenty of liquids throughout the day.
    • Take rest as much as possible.
    • Never take any medicines while not your doctors approval, this includes general medication and over-the-counter medication.
    • Apart from after you are breastfeeding, keep a distance from your baby, sinus infections are contagious.
    • Follow your doctors instructions.
    • Eat, even after you dont have a craving, as you would like to stay your energy levels high.

    What Tests Diagnose Sinus Infections And Sinusitis

    The diagnosis of a sinus infection is made based on a medical history assessment and a physical examination. Adequately distinguishing sinusitis from a simple upper respiratory infection or a common cold is important.

    • Usually, sinusitis caused by bacteria will need antibiotic treatment to cure the infection.
    • Upper respiratory tract infections and colds are viral illnesses so antibiotics have no benefit, and it may cause antibiotic resistance, which limits your body’s ability to cure future infections.

    CT scan: In most cases, diagnosing acute sinusitis requires no testing. When testing is indicated, a CT scan will clearly depict all the paranasal sinuses, the nasal passages, and the surrounding structures. A CT scan may indicate a sinus infection if any of these conditions is present:

    • Air-fluid levels in one or more sinuses
    • Total blockage in one or more sinuses
    • Thickening of the inner lining of the sinuses
    • Mucosal thickening can occur in people without symptoms of sinusitis. CT scan findings must be correlated with a person’s symptoms and physical examination findings to diagnose a sinus infection.

    Ultrasound: Another noninvasive diagnostic tool is ultrasound. The procedure is fast, reliable, and less expensive than a CT scan, although the results are not as detailed.

    If your symptoms symptoms persist despite therapy, you may need a referral to an otolaryngologist or ENT . The doctor may:

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    The Difference Between A Cold And A Sinus Infection

    The common cold is a respiratory disease caused by a virus. It’s also one of the most common illnesses in the U.S., with adults getting an average of two to three colds per year, and children catching between eight and 12 colds per year. Most of the time, colds resolve on their own within three to seven days, with some symptoms possibly lingering for up to two weeks. But in some cases, colds can temporarily weaken the immune system or cause swelling of the lining of the airways or nose. This can lead to a secondary viral or bacterial infection, such as a sinus infection.

    A sinus infection or sinusitis is the swelling of the lining of the sinuses and nose. The most common cause of a sinus infection is a virus associated with a cold. However, about two percent of sinus infections are bacterial infections. Sinus infections usually improve within 10 days, but when they last longer, they’re more likely to be bacterial infections.

    Stuffy And Runny Nose

    How to Treat a Sinus Infection Naturally

    Nonallergic rhinitis occurs when blood vessels in your nose expand , filling the nasal lining with blood and fluid. There are several possible causes of this abnormal expansion of the blood vessels or inflammation in the nose. But, whatever the trigger, the result is the same swollen nasal membranes and congestion.

    Many things can trigger the nasal swelling in nonallergic rhinitis some resulting in short-lived symptoms while others cause chronic problems. Nonallergic rhinitis triggers include:

    Environmental or occupational irritants. Dust, smog, secondhand smoke or strong odors, such as perfumes, can trigger nonallergic rhinitis. Chemical fumes, such as those you might be exposed to in certain occupations, also may be to blame.

    Weather changes. Temperature or humidity changes can trigger the membranes inside your nose to swell and cause a runny or stuffy nose.

    Infections. A common cause of nonallergic rhinitis is a viral infection a cold or the flu, for example. This type of nonallergic rhinitis usually clears up after a few weeks, but can cause lingering mucus in the throat . Sometimes, this type of rhinitis can become chronic, causing ongoing discolored nasal discharge, facial pain and pressure .

    Foods and beverages. Nonallergic rhinitis may occur when you eat, especially when eating hot or spicy foods. Drinking alcoholic beverages also may cause the membranes inside your nose to swell, leading to nasal congestion.

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    When To See Your Doctor For Nasal Congestion

    See your doctor for nasal congestion if your symptoms last more than ten days, dont respond to over the counter treatment and lifestyle changes, your nasal discharge is yellow or green, or if you experience a fever.

    A fever is an indicator that your symptoms are a result of bacterial infection, which will require prescribed antibiotics.

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    Tests For A Sinus Infection During Pregnancy

    If you seek medical attention, your doctor may conduct a variety of tests. These include:

    • Nasal endoscopy. Your doctor inserts a thin, flexible tube into your nose to examine your sinuses.
    • Imaging tests. Your doctor may order a CT scan or an MRI to take pictures of your sinuses to help them confirm a diagnosis.

    Depending on your specific case, your doctor may also order a nasal and sinus culture to determine the underlying cause of your sinus infection. You may also undergo allergy testing to see whether allergies are triggering your chronic sinus infections.

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    How It Feels

    Most people have a stuffy nose and pain or pressure in several areas around the face or teeth. There’s usually a nasal discharge that may be yellow, green, or clear. You may also have fatigue, trouble with sense of smell or taste, cough, sore throat, bad breath, headache, pain when you bend forward, and fever.

    When Is A Z

    The 9 Best Sinus Infection Medications On Amazon

    Spoiler alert: its not! Because its so easy to use, the Z-Pak used to be a go-to prescription for sinus infections. But it turns out that only a minority of these prescriptions are appropriate because the majority of sinus infections are viral and not bacterial. In fact, studies have found that about a third of antibiotic prescriptions for sinus infections, sore throats, and ear infections arent even necessary. Overprescribing antibiotics increases the chance that bacteria will become resistant to them and disrupt the gut bacterial flora for months. Indeed, azithromycin is no longer recommended for bacterial sinus infections due to the risk of resistance.

    If you have a sinus infection, expect to feel lousy for several days. After all, your body is waging war against an infection. You might experience:

    • A runny nose

    • A sore throat

    • A cough

    Youre also likely to feel more tired and achy and maybe even experience a low-grade fever. Most people improve within a week, but symptoms can last up to 2 weeks. Coughs can linger for a week after that.

    Treating a sinus infection boils down to whether its viral or bacterial. Colds, for example, are viral. And antibiotics like the Z-Pak are not effective against viral infections. In fact, viral sinus infections have no cure. Treatment is aimed at managing symptoms and includes:

    If you still dont feel better, your healthcare provider may suggest nasal or lung inhalers for other symptoms.

    • Diarrhea

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