Friday, June 17, 2022

Sinus Infection Fever And Chills

Youre Having A Panic Attack

Cold or sinus infection? Local pediatrician goes over the symptoms between the two

Chills can occur if you have a profound or intense emotional reaction to a situation, according to Taroyan. Emotions that might cause chills include fear or anxiety, she says.

According to the American Psychiatric Association, nearly 30% of all adults will experience an anxiety disorder during their lifetime. A panic attack can cause a combination of physical as well as psychological symptoms, including chills, shortness of breath, heart palpitations, sweating, dizziness and chest pain. Because of the severity of the symptoms, a panic attack sometimes causes people to think theyre having a heart attack.

If youve never had a panic attack before, seek medical attention. If youve been diagnosed with an anxiety disorder, psychotherapy and medication can help.

Sore Throat And Hoarse Voice

Postnasal drip can leave you with a raw and aching throat. Although it may start as an annoying tickle, it can get worse.

If your infection lasts for a few weeks or more, mucus can irritate and inflame your throat as it drips, resulting in a painful sore throat and hoarse voice. Frequent coughing and throat clearing can make a hoarse voice worse.

Causes Of Sinus Infection

There may be several causes of sinus infection. Typically a sinus infection starts from a cold, and develops because the mucus in your sinus does not drain properly and causes an infection in your sinus cavity. Most sinus infections are viral but some are bacterial.

Allergies can also cause a sinus infection. More severe causes included a deviated septum, nasal bone spur, or polyps in your nose. If you have recurrent acute sinusitis, your doctor may run additional tests to rule out a different medical condition causing your sinus infections.

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About Author: Lisa Coon

Lisa Coon is a Writing Coordinator for OSF HealthCare, where she has worked since August 2016. A Peoria native, she is a graduate of Bradley University with a degree in journalism. Previously, she worked as a reporter and editor at several newspapers in Iowa and Illinois.She lives in Groveland with her husband and son. In her free time she likes to cook, bake and read. She freely admits that reality TV is a weakness, and she lives by the quote, The beach is good for the soul.

When To See A Doctor About A Sinus Infection

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On the other hand, a secondary acute bacterial infection may develop, so it’s advised that you see a doctor if your symptoms last more than 10 days or if your symptoms initially improve but then worsen again within the first 7 days.

See a doctor immediately if you experience:

  • A persistent fever higher than 102 degrees F
  • Changes in vision, including double vision
  • Symptoms that are not relieved with over-the-counter medicines
  • Multiple infections within the past year
  • Sudden, severe pain in the face or head
  • Confusion
  • Swelling or redness around the eyes
  • Stiff neck

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Check If You Have Sinusitis

Sinusitis is common after a cold or flu.

Symptoms of sinusitis include:

  • pain, swelling and tenderness around your cheeks, eyes or forehead
  • a blocked nose
  • a reduced sense of smell
  • green or yellow mucus from your nose
  • a sinus headache
  • toothache
  • bad breath

Signs of sinusitis in young children may also include irritability, difficulty feeding, and breathing through their mouth.

The sinuses are small, empty spaces behind your cheekbones and forehead that connect to the inside of the nose.

Sinusitis causes the lining of the sinuses to swell up.

This stops mucus draining into your nose and throat properly, making you feel blocked up.

Causes And Risk Factors Of Sinus Infection

The terms “sinus infection” and “sinusitis” are often used interchangeably, but sinusitis simply refers to the inflammation of the sinuses, with or without an infection. The medical term for sinusitis is rhinosinusitis because the illness affects the mucous membranes in both the sinuses and nose.

Sinus infections ultimately develop because of sinus and nasal blockages that result in sinus inflammation. There are several underlying causes of sinus blockage, including various environmental, anatomical, and genetic factors. But the most common cause of the blockage is inflammation or swelling of the nasal passages because of the common cold or allergies.

In healthy people, mucosal secretions are always moving and draining into the nasal cavity. But

when blockage occurs, mucus fails to drain properly, increases in thickness, and fills the sinus spaces.

The cilia also slow down their sweeping and cleaning, making it even harder for mucus to drain.

When the mucus is unable to drain, it becomes the perfect medium for microbes to grow out of control and cause an infection.

Also Check: Do Antibiotics Work On Sinus Infections

Common Colds And Sinus Infections

A viral infection associated with the common cold is the most common cause of sinus infections .

This virus may jump to other people, causing a cold that may also develop into viral sinusitis.

In only 0.5 to 2 percent of cases do people develop bacterial sinusitis , which is typically a complication of viral sinusitis. Bacterial sinusitis is not contagious.

In rare cases, fungi can cause a sinus infection, particularly if a person has a fungal allergy. But fungal sinusitis generally does not affect people with healthy immune systems.

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Related Conditions And Causes Of Sinus Infections

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Colds, allergies, and sinus infections can cause similar symptoms, including stuffiness and headache. What’s more, both colds and allergies can cause sinus inflammation. So how can you tell the difference between these illnesses?

The truth is, even doctors can sometimes have difficulty differentiating among colds, allergies, and sinus infections. But the illnesses do present differently.

A hallmark sign that you have a sinus infection is that the illness is, as you’d expect, severely affecting your sinuses. Both colds and allergies can cause congestion and runny nose, but sinus infections typically cause an aching sensation and pressure in the face, including in the ears and teeth.

Additionally, postnasal drop, reduced sense of smell, and halitosis are typically associated with sinus infections.

The mucus associated with a sinus infection is usually green or yellow, though color alone isn’t enough to determine the cause of your nasal distress, as there are many reasons your nasal discharge may not be clear.

Both allergies and colds can cause sneezing, a symptom not typically seen in sinus infections. Allergies never cause fever, which is seen in both colds and sinus infections.

And if your symptoms last more than 10 days, you most likely don’t have a cold.

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Complications Of Sinus Infection

Sinus inflammation can spread to the bones and soft tissues of the face and eyes. This can cause:

  • Cellulitis of the face or around the eyes
  • Abscesses of the eyes
  • Blindness

Left intreated, sinus infections can also lead to serious intracranial complications, including blood clots within the cavernous sinus, pus between the skulls and dura mater , and meningitis.

Research And Statistics: Who Gets Sinus Infections

Each year, acute sinusitis affects about 31 million Americans, who spend a whopping $1 billion on over-the-counter medications and $150 million on prescription medications to treat the illness, according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology.

Epidemiologic studies suggest 5 to 12 percent of people have chronic sinus infections. However, research published in December 2018 in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology suggests this may be an overestimation due to misdiagnosis. According to the study, which relied on imaging tests for diagnosis , about 3.0 to 6.4 percent of people may have chronic sinus infections. 32786-6/fulltext” rel=”nofollow”> 5)

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How To Tell When Your Cold Has Become A Sinus Infection

As the temperatures drop here in Connecticut, New York and Massachusetts, the common cold is on the rise. The symptoms are no mystery: congestion and runny nose, cough, headache and perhaps a sore throat and mild fever. But sometimes that cold can lead to a less common condition that shares many of the same symptoms: a sinus infection.While treatment with antibiotics will do nothing to improve a cold, it could be necessary to clear up a sinus infection. Thats why its important to know how to tell the difference so you can seek care when its needed.Heres what you need to know

How A Sinus Infection Happens

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Colds can progress to become sinus infections, but not all sinus infections are viral. Bacteria and even allergies also can cause sinus infections.

A sinus infection occurs when the sinus lining becomes inflamed, preventing the sinuses from draining, he says. The trapped mucous becomes a breeding ground for bacteria, which can lead to a sinus infection.

Conditions that may make you more likely to get a sinus infection include:

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How Is Sinusitis Treated

Sinusitis is treated in several ways, each depending on how severe the case of sinusitis is.

A simple sinusitis infection is treated with:

  • Drinking fluids .

If symptoms of sinusitis don’t improve after 10 days, your doctor may prescribe:

  • Antibiotics .
  • Oral or topical decongestants.
  • Prescription intranasal steroid sprays. .

Long-term sinusitis may be treated by focusing on the underlying condition . This is usually treated with:

  • Intranasal steroid sprays.
  • Topical antihistamine sprays or oral pills.
  • Leukotriene antagonists to reduce swelling and allergy symptoms.
  • Rinsing the nose with saline solutions that might also contain other types of medication.

When sinusitis isn’t controlled by one of the above treatments, a CT scan is used to take a better look at your sinuses. Depending on the results, surgery may be needed to correct structural problems in your sinuses. This is most likely to happen if you have polyps and/or a fungal infection.

Sinus Infection Treatment And Sinus Pressure Relief

If youre suffering from a short bout of sinusitis which is inflammation of the sinuses from a cold or allergies, but not necessarily infection there are several things you can do at home to ease your sinus pressure symptoms. Use over-the-counter decongestants and saline nose spray to open up the nasal passages. Pain relievers like ibuprofen or acetaminophen can provide relief from sinus pain as well.However, if your symptoms last more than a few days you should see a doctor for evaluation and treatment. If your cold or sinusitis has developed into a bacterial sinus infection, you may need antibiotics to treat it. Both adults and children can receive care for sinus infections at any of our PhysicianOne Urgent Care centers in Connecticut, Massachusetts or New York, 365 days per year. You can even check in online now at the center nearest you for a convenient appointment with minimal time in the waiting room.

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How Is Sinusitis Diagnosed

Your healthcare provider will ask you a lot of questions in order to develop a detailed medical history and find out about your symptoms. They will also do a physical examination. During the exam, your care provider will check your ears, nose and throat for any swelling, draining or blockage. An endoscope may be used to look inside the nose. In some cases, you might be referred to an ear, nose and throat specialist. If you needed an imaging exam, your provider would order a computed tomography scan.

How Are Sinus Infections Treated

What’s Going Around – sinus infections

Many sinus infections caused by a virus will resolve on their own without any treatment with antibiotics, Melinda said. This is important because if you dont need antibiotics, its better not to take them as they can cause side effects and long-term resistance. An infection caused by bacteria, however, will likely require antibiotics.

Sometimes your health care provider may ask you to take over-the-counter medications to help your symptoms and monitor your condition further.

Examples of over-the-counter medication include:

  • Saline nasal spray
  • Acetaminophen or ibuprofen for pain relief
  • A warm compress on your nose and forehead to relieve sinus pressure

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Treatment For Sinusitis From A Gp

If you have sinusitis, a GP may be able to recommend other medicines to help with your symptoms, such as:

  • steroid nasal sprays or drops â to reduce the swelling in your sinuses
  • antihistamines â if an allergy is causing your symptoms
  • antibiotics â if a bacterial infection is causing your symptoms and you’re very unwell or at risk of complications

You might need to take steroid nasal sprays or drops for a few months. They sometimes cause irritation, sore throats or nosebleeds.

A GP may refer you to an ear, nose and throat specialist if, for example, you:

  • still have sinusitis after 3 months of treatment
  • keep getting sinusitis
  • only have symptoms on 1 side of your face

They may also recommend surgery in some cases.

Causes Of The Common Cold Covid

The common cold and COVID-19 are both caused by different viruses. The virus that causes the cold affects the upper respiratory tract, while the novel coronavirus can affect both the upper and lower respiratory tract.

A sinus infection is caused when your sinuses get blocked and fill with fluid, allowing bacteria to grow. The blockage can be due to allergies, nasal polyps, a deviated septum, or a virus like the cold. The infection can cause swelling or inflammation in the sinuses. This can cause several symptoms, many of which are similar to that of a cold.

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The Difference Between A Common Cold And A Sinus Infection

There is a large crossover between the symptoms of a cold and a sinus infection, making it confusing to self-diagnose. In both a cold and sinusitis, you might experience postnasal drip, low-grade fevers, headaches, fatigue, a cough, congestion, etc. Outside of the sinus pressure and green snot that is suggestive of sinusitis, the main difference is the recovery time.

Your cold should go away within 10 days, maximum. So, how long does a sinus infection last?

If you have a common cold that lasts longer than two weeks, you might actually have a sinus infection. Acute sinus infections can last up to four weeks. If your sinus infection lasts for more than 12 weeks without any relief, you should schedule an appointment to see your doctor.

Treating Your Sinus Infection

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If you think you have a sinus infection, you may need to see your doctor.

âMostly, these acute infections go away on their own or after a simple course of antibiotics,â says ear, nose, and throat specialist Greg Davis, who practices at the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle.

Davis recommends sinus irrigation for sinus infections. It can help ease your symptoms while you wait for the antibiotics to do their job. Steroids, , and over-the-counter mucus thinners can also ease your discomfort, he says.

See an ear, nose, and throat specialist if your sinus infection doesnât go away after one or two courses of antibiotics, Davis says.

Some people have sinus infections over and over. The only known risk factors, Davis says, are allergies and smoking In rare cases, an acute infection can become chronic if itâs not treated successfully.

If you have chronic infections, and antibiotics and other treatments donât help, you may need sinus surgery, Davis says.

Your doctor will enlarge the small or inflamed and swollen openings of your sinuses, allowing them to drain, and letting you breathe more easily.

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Some Steps You Can Take

Whether your sinus infection turns out to be viral or bacterial, you can help to ease your symptoms early on with supportive sinus care:

  • Use saline spray two to three times per day in each nostril.
  • Use a nasal decongestant such as Afrin®, but not longer than three days.
  • Drink eight 8-ounce glasses of fluid per day.
  • Get plenty of rest.
  • Take an over-the-counter anti-inflammatory, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen to help relieve the swelling of your sinuses.
  • If your symptoms arent improving after one week, its important to see your doctor. If a bacterial infection is suspected, youll probably need to take an antibiotic to clear up the infection and prevent further complications.

    If your infections occur more frequently, and your doctor really wants to establish if they are bacterial or viral, your Otolaryngologist or ear, nose and throat doctor can sample the snot from your nose when youre infected and send it to a laboratory to know for sure.

    Note: Antibiotics wont help a viral infection, and taking an antibiotic unnecessarily can do more harm than good. You risk possible side effects and increase your chances of developing antibiotic resistance, which can make future infections harder to treat, says Dr. Sindwani. So its important to wait and see how long your symptoms last.

    What Are The Different Types Of Sinuses Near The Nose And Eyes

    The paranasal sinuses are located in your head near your nose and eyes. They are named after the bones that provide their structure.

    • The ethmoidal sinuses are located between your eyes.
    • The maxillary sinuses are located below your eyes.
    • The sphenoidal sinuses are located behind your eyes.
    • The frontal sinuses are located above your eyes.

    The biggest sinus cavity is the maxillary cavity, and it is one of the cavities that most often becomes infected.

    There are different types of sinusitis:

    • Acute bacterial sinusitis: This term refers to a sudden onset of cold symptoms such as runny nose, stuffy nose, and facial pain that does not go away after 10 days, or symptoms that seem to improve but then return and are worse than the initial symptoms . It responds well to antibiotics and decongestants.
    • Chronic sinusitis: This term refers to a condition defined by nasal congestion, drainage, facial pain/pressure, and decreased sense of smell for at least 12 weeks.
    • Subacute sinusitis: This term is used when the symptoms last four to twelve weeks.
    • Recurrent acute sinusitis: This term is used when the symptoms come back four or more times in one year and last less than two weeks each time.

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