Monday, June 27, 2022

When Should I Get Antibiotics For Sinus Infection

Using The Right Water During Saline Rinses

Do Antibiotics Help With Sinus Infections?

When using saline nasal rinses, tap water should always be boiled and then allowed to cool to ensure cleanliness distilled water or premixed solutions could also be used instead of regular tap water.

Other home remedies for sinus infections include:

  • Drinking fluids: Drinking lots of fluids helps loosen and thin mucus. Avoid beverages that are caffeinated and alcoholic beverages that can dehydrate the body, which could thicken mucus.
  • Breathing steam: Warm water is best . You can breathe in steam from either a bowl or shower.
  • Humidifying the air: Use a cool air vaporizer or humidifier,particularly at night while sleeping.
  • Avoiding environmental substances: Avoid tobacco smoke and chlorinated water that can dry up the mucus membranes and exacerbate symptoms.
  • Implementing treatment measures: At the first sign of infection, use antihistamines and employ regular nasal rinses.

Should You Treat A Sinus Infection With Antibiotics

Over the past few months Ive seen patient after patient drag themselves to the clinic with coughing, sneezing, headaches and green or yellow nasal discharge, sometimes accompanied by ear and tooth pain. Some people with infection may experience fevers, chills or night sweats signs that the body is fighting a virus or bacteria. These are symptoms I expect as a primary care doctor especially during the spring seasons. They are the telltale signs of sinusitis. But if that sums up symptoms you have, do you need antibiotics? The question may be more complicated than you think.

Each year, more than 30 million Americans endure sinusitis an inflammation of sinus spaces surrounding the nose that makes it difficult to drain fluid that normally flows through the sinuses. Much like a detective weighing clues, us health providers use symptom severity and duration to determine the cause of a patients sickness.

The World Health Organization has called antibiotic resistance one of the biggest threats to global health, saying misuse of antibiotics in humans and animals is accelerating the process.

At a health professionals discretion, antibiotics can be prescribed if a person appears very sick or has any underlying chronic disease that may make them prone to becoming sicker.

How To Treat A Sinus Infection Without Antibiotics

Before you consider antibiotics, a sinus infection can be treated without leaving at home. Some of the home remedies to treat a sinus infection without antibiotics include:

  • Keep your sinuses hydrated to help relieve pressure. One good way is to expose your sinuses to steam.
  • Drink plenty of water.
  • Essential oils like eucalyptus and peppermint oils may help open the airways and ease congestion.
  • Apply warm and cold compression alternately to relieve sinus pain and pressure.
  • Eat healthy foods colorful fruits and veggies that boost your immune system. These foods contain lots of vitamin C to fight off viruses.
  • Get plenty of rest for your body to heal and fight the infection.
  • Read Also: Does Amoxicillin Help With Sinus Infection

    What Happens If A Sinus Infection Is Left Untreated

    For some lucky people, sinus infections may go away if left untreated. Rest and hydration will certainly help with this.

    For others, however, sinusitis wont go away until you seek treatment. If this is the case, a sinus infection left untreated may cause further complications .

    When sinusitis spreads to areas around the eyes, you may experience redness and swelling, which can reduce vision. The most severe form of sinusitis reaching the eye is called cavernous sinus thrombosis and can actually cause blindness. It is treated by antibiotics and drainage of sinus fluids.

    Sinusitis that reaches the brain may cause meningitis and brain abscesses.

    When Do We Need Antibiotics For Sinus Infection

    The Fastest Way to get a Prescription for a Sinus ...

    Antibiotics are not needed for many sinus infections, but your doctor can decide if you need an antibiotic. You doctor may recommend antibiotics if:

  • You have symptoms of a bacterial infection and you have not gotten better after 10 days, even with home treatment.
  • You have severe symptoms such as severe headache or facial pain, or you have other problems, such as pus forming in your sinus cavities.
  • You have had sinusitis for 12 weeks or longer .
  • You have a fever longer than 3-4 days.
  • Your symptoms get worse after initially improving.
  • Most sinus infections usually get better on their own without antibiotics. When antibiotics arent needed, they wont help you, and their side effects could still cause harm. Side effects can range from minor issues, like a rash, to very serious health problems, such as antibiotic-resistant infections and C. diff infection, which causes diarrhea that can lead to severe colon damage and death.

    Read Also: The Best Antibiotic For Sinus Infection

    Risk Of Unnecessary Antibiotics For Sinus Infections

    Taking unnecessary antibiotics for a sinus infection is not only ineffectual, but can actually be harmful to the patient. Risks of taking unneeded antibiotics include:

    • Increased chance of getting an antibiotic-resistant infection at a later time
    • Destruction of healthy stomach bacteria, which can allow harmful bacteria to grow
    • Possible side effects, such as upset stomach, rash, or dizziness
    • Allergic reaction

    According to studies conducted by the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology , 60-70% of patients with sinus infections fully recover without the use of antibiotics. Additional research shows that almost 90% of U.S. adults diagnosed with acute sinusitis are prescribed antibiotics.

    This overuse of antibiotics for sinus infections, as well as other conditions, can lead to antibiotic resistance, a state in which bacteria change over time as a reaction to antibiotic treatment, in order to survive and multiply, thus making the antibiotics less effective.

    How To Treat Sinus Infections Without Antibiotics

    While sinus infections caused by viruses, allergies, or other non-bacterial factors may not require antibiotics, they still cause the same symptoms which make you feel sick.

    Symptoms of a sinus infection include:

    • Nasal congestion
    • Pain or tenderness around the eyes, cheeks, or forehead
    • Thick nasal or post-nasal drainage

    Taking steps to alleviate your sinusitis symptoms is often the best treatment to lessen your discomfort.

    Sinus infection treatment options include:

    • Drink plenty of fluids
    • Rest, especially the first few days, to help your body fight the infection
    • Moisturize the air with a cool-mist vaporizer
    • Elevate your head while sleeping to decrease post-nasal drip
    • Take warm showers or baths, as steam can soothe your sore throat and loosen mucus
    • Gargle with warm salt water for a sore throat
    • Use saline nasal spray or nasal irrigation kit to alleviate congestion
    • Use over-the-counter treatments, such as nasal drops and sprays or pseudoephedrine pills, as your doctor recommends them

    What Not to Do for a Sinus Infection

    You should always follow your doctors instructions when you are diagnosed with a sinus infection.

    Do not:

    • Ask for antibiotics if your doctor feels they are unnecessary
    • Take antibiotics that are prescribed for someone else
    • Skip doses of your antibiotics or stop taking your antibiotics early when your doctor prescribes them
    • Save antibiotics for the next time you get sick

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    What Tests Diagnose The Cause Of Sinus Infections And Sinusitis

    Sinus infection is most often diagnosed based on the history and examination of a doctor. Because plain X-ray studies of the sinuses may be misleading and procedures such as CT and MRI scans, which are much more sensitive in their ability to diagnose a sinus infection, are so expensive and not available in most doctors’ offices, most sinus infections are initially diagnosed and treated based on clinical findings on examination. These physical findings may include:

    • redness and swelling of the nasal passages,
    • purulent drainage from the nasal passages ,
    • tenderness to percussion over the cheeks or forehead region of the sinuses, and
    • swelling about the eyes and cheeks.

    Occasionally, nasal secretions are examined for secreted cells that may help differentiate between infectious and allergic sinusitis. Infectious sinusitis may show specialized cells of infection while allergic sinusitis may show specialized white blood cells of allergy . Physicians prescribe antibiotics if the bacterial infection is suspected. Antibiotics are not effective against viral infections many physicians then treat the symptoms.

    In addition, both rigid and flexible endoscopy has been used to obtain diagnostic material from sinuses. These procedures are usually done by an otolaryngologist under topical and local anesthesia. Occasionally, there may be a need to sedate the patient. Some investigators suggest that endoscopy specimens are comparable to those obtained by needle puncture.

    Do I Have Covid Or A Sinus Infection

    Discussion with a patient with sinusitis who requests antibiotics

    Although some of the symptoms are shared, there are several distinct ways to tell if you have covid or a sinus infection.

    Its human nature to sometimes think the worst if you experience any symptoms in todays environment but in fact, the common cold, influenza, allergies, and sinus infections share some of the same symptoms as the COVID-19.

    Heres how you can tell the difference and when you should consider seeking medical help.

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    Check If You Have Sinusitis

    Sinusitis is common after a cold or flu.

    Symptoms of sinusitis include:

    • pain, swelling and tenderness around your cheeks, eyes or forehead
    • a blocked nose
    • a reduced sense of smell
    • green or yellow mucus from your nose
    • a sinus headache
    • toothache
    • bad breath

    Signs of sinusitis in young children may also include irritability, difficulty feeding, and breathing through their mouth.

    The sinuses are small, empty spaces behind your cheekbones and forehead that connect to the inside of the nose.

    Sinusitis causes the lining of the sinuses to swell up.

    This stops mucus draining into your nose and throat properly, making you feel blocked up.

    Is Your Sinus Infection Caused By A Virus Or Bacteria

    Physicians may not know if sinusitis is bacterial or viral, because the diagnosis is typically done by observing symptoms. Symptoms include:

    • Nasal congestion
    • Headache
    • Thick nasal or post-nasal drainage

    Sometimes other tests such as computed tomography scan or cultures are used to help make the diagnosis.

    Despite the recommendations that antibiotic use be judicious, they are still overused for sinusitis, according to many physicians who specialize in treating sinus problems.

    Some physicians say they give patients with sinusitis a prescription for antibiotics, and recommend they wait three to five days before filling it, and only fill it if symptoms are not better by then. A can be used to help relieve your symptoms and promote drainage.

    The longer symptoms last, the more likely a sinus problem is to be a bacterial infection, some experts say.

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    What You Need To Know About Sinus Infections

    As the fall months approach, the potential for seasonal allergies, runny noses and sinus infections increases.

    Sinus infections happen when fluid builds up in the air-filled pockets in the face. This allows germs to grow. Viruses cause most sinus infections, but bacteria can also be the culprit.

    However, Jessica Grayson, M.D., an assistant professor with the University of Alabama at BirminghamDepartment of Otolaryngology, says many people confuse sinus infections for sinus pressure.

    When people say they have sinus pressure, they may mean nasal congestion, Grayson said. Bilateral congestion could mean a person has a viral infection or an allergic reaction. Viral infections dont pick and choose a side.

    Grayson adds that people who live in more humid climates like the South tend to suffer more from seasonal allergies because the humidity allows more fungus to grow, and long growing seasons allow for other trees, grasses and weeds. Living in cities can also affect people with allergies due to dust mites.

    If your sinus pressure is isolated, you might have a bacterial infection, she said. Thats when you really should go see a doctor. With a virus, you just have to let it run its course.

    Some people do get repetitive events, and people who work with small children, such as teachers or day care workers, are more likely to get recurrent viral infections.

    Treatment

    Home remedies

    Jessica Grayson, M.D.That pesky flu

    Aftermath

    Sinus Infections: Your Top 5 Questions Answered

    What is the best antibiotic for a Sinusitis Infection?

    Cold and flu season isnt quite over yet. If you have congestion that includes sinus pressure, you may have a coldor it could be a sinus infection. How can you be sure that its one or the other, and when is it time to make an appointment with your doctor?

    Eric L. Winarsky, M.D., an otolaryngologist and surgeon with Hackensack Meridian Health Medical Group, helps answer the 5 most Googled questions about nasal inflammation and sinus infections.

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    Ways To Recognize Serious Signs Of Sinus Infections

    #1: Duration

    The length of the infection is an important determinant of the seriousness of the infection.

    I usually consider most infections less than 3 weeks to be viral or inflammation related to congestion. At this point, the best treatment is usually medications that decrease the congestion and inflammation. This in turn will alleviate the symptoms and ultimately cure the illness.

    When the illness continues beyond 3 weeks, bacterial infection can begin to develop. Though antibiotics can be considered at this point, other treatments may still be the best answer if they have not yet been given a try.

    #2: Mucous Color

    I will dispel a myth right here and now. Yellowish/greenish mucous does not necessarily mean the infection is bacterial.

    Viruses can cause the same color mucous. The reason for the mucous is generally not the actual bacteria or virus, but the bodys immune response to the intruder.

    So dont worry just because you see a colored mucous when you blow your nose. This will also improve as the infection abates.

    #3: Sinus Pain

    Sinus pain can occur anytime throughout a sinus infection. This is normal and means there is inflammation in the sinuses, as we discussed previously.

    However, severe pain, redness over the skin, hardened skin over the sinuses, or even a severe headache are not generally normal and can indicate a bacterial infection.

    #4: Fever

    A fever can be caused by both viruses and bacteria. So how do you differentiate between the two?

    Sinus Infection Antibiotics No Help

    Antibiotics, Steroid Spray No Help for Adult Sinus Infections

    Dec. 4, 2007 — Neither antibiotics nor steroid sprays offer much help to adults with sinus infections, a British study shows.

    One of the most common complications of the common cold or flu is a sinus infection. The symptoms: a stuffy nose a thick, dark-colored nasal discharge and head pain.

    You’ve very likely had such an infection. And if, like 25 million other Americans, you went to a U.S. doctor, there’s a 90% chance you got a prescription for antibiotics.

    You very likely had some side effects from that antibiotic. But it’s extremely unlikely the antibiotics you took were much help, according to a study by Ian G. Williamson, MD, senior lecturer at the University of Southampton, England.

    “We are confident that if there is an effect of antibiotics on acute sinus infections, it is not very big — certainly not as big as people have been led to believe,” Williamson tells WebMD.

    Williamson and colleagues studied 240 patients ages 16 and older whose symptoms suggested that they had a sinus infection caused by bacteria. Viruses also cause sinus infections, but antibiotics do not help viral infections.

    Study patients received antibiotic treatment with amoxicillin, an antibiotic often used for bacterial sinus infections, with or without nasal steroid sprays. A fourth of the patients received no treatment at all, but just got inactive placebo pills and placebo sprays.

    Show Sources

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    Chronic Sinus Infection Treatment

    Chronic sinus infections typically have a more mysterious cause than acute infections people with chronic sinus infections often require life-long treatment to keep symptoms at bay.

    In addition to the options above, treatment for chronic sinus infections may include:

    • Lifestyle changes, such as quitting smoking and changing home or work conditions to reduce exposure to environmental toxins and allergens, such as dust mites, pet dander, or cockroaches
    • Oral steroids
    • Leukotriene modifiers, which reduce inflammation through a different mechanism than steroids
    • Surgery to reopen sinuses affected by issues like nasal polyps and deviated septum

    Recent research suggests other treatment options may also exist for chronic sinus infections, including:

    • Nasal probiotics of the beneficial bacteria lactobacilli
    • The drug dupilumab, derived from a human antibody, which the Food and Drug Administration approved to treat chronic sinus infections with nasal polyps in 2019
    • A regime combining oral and intranasal corticosteroid irrigations

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    Sinusitis Wont Go Away Consider Balloon Sinuplasty

    Sinus Infections Shouldn’t be Treated with Antibiotic

    Whether this is your first bout with sinusitis that wont go away or you experience sinus infections on a regular basis, you should know that getting rid of sinusitis is well within reach.

    At Sinus Solutions of South Florida, Dr. Napoleon G. Bequer has provided hundreds of patients with relief from chronic sinusitis using the balloon sinuplasty procedure. So if you have sinusitis that wont go away, contact us online, call us at 561-790-7744, or take our sinus quiz today to see if youre a viable candidate for balloon sinuplasty.

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    Can A Sinus Infection Last For Months

    Sinusitis wont go away at the drop of a hat. It tends to linger and, if left untreated, it can last for months. Again, its best to take a trip to your doctors office if your symptoms last longer than one week.

    Note that there is a chance that long-term sinus issues may be caused by allergens. If this is the case, then your sinus symptoms will likely last until you can escape the allergen or have the allergies treated.

    Treating Sinus Infections: Dont Rush To Antibiotics

    Millions of people are prescribed antibiotics each year for sinus infections, a frequent complication of the common cold, hay fever, and other respiratory allergies. In fact, 15 to 21 percent of all antibiotic prescriptions for adults in outpatient care are for treating sinus infections. Unfortunately, most of those people dont need the drugs. Heres why:

    The drugs usually dont help.

    Sinus infections can be painful. People with the condition usually have a stuffy nose combined with yellow, green, or gray nasal discharge plus pain or pressure around the eyes, cheeks, forehead, or teeth that worsens when they bend over. But sinus infections almost always stem from a viral infection, not a bacterial oneand antibiotics dont work against viruses. Even when bacteria are the cause, the infections often clear up on their own in a week or so. And antibiotics dont help ease allergies, either.

    They can pose risks.

    About one in four people who take antibiotics have side effects, such as stomach problems, dizziness, or rashes. Those problems clear up soon after stopping the drugs, but in rare cases antibiotics can cause severe allergic reactions. Overuse of antibiotics also promotes the growth of bacteria that cant be controlled easily with drugs. That makes you more vulnerable to antibiotic-resistant infections and undermines the good that antibiotics can do for others.

    So when are antibiotics necessary?

    How should you treat sinus infections?

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