Thursday, June 16, 2022

Typical Antibiotic For Sinus Infection

What Are The Different Types Of Sinuses Near The Nose And Eyes

2012-02/14 COMMON ANTIBIOTIC PROVIDES NO BENEFIT FOR PATIENTS WITH ACUTE SINUSITIS

The paranasal sinuses are located in your head near your nose and eyes. They are named after the bones that provide their structure.

  • The ethmoidal sinuses are located between your eyes.
  • The maxillary sinuses are located below your eyes.
  • The sphenoidal sinuses are located behind your eyes.
  • The frontal sinuses are located above your eyes.

The biggest sinus cavity is the maxillary cavity, and it is one of the cavities that most often becomes infected.

There are different types of sinusitis:

  • Acute bacterial sinusitis: This term refers to a sudden onset of cold symptoms such as runny nose, stuffy nose, and facial pain that does not go away after 10 days, or symptoms that seem to improve but then return and are worse than the initial symptoms . It responds well to antibiotics and decongestants.
  • Chronic sinusitis: This term refers to a condition defined by nasal congestion, drainage, facial pain/pressure, and decreased sense of smell for at least 12 weeks.
  • Subacute sinusitis: This term is used when the symptoms last four to twelve weeks.
  • Recurrent acute sinusitis: This term is used when the symptoms come back four or more times in one year and last less than two weeks each time.

What Are The Most Common Antibiotics Used For Sinusitis

Amoxicillin remains the drug of choice for acute, uncomplicated bacterial sinusitis. Amoxicillin is most effective when given frequently enough to sustain adequate levels in the infected tissue. While often prescribed twice daily, it is even more effective if taken in 3 or 4 divided doses. Amoxicillin is typically prescribed for 7-10 days at a time. While it is critical to finish the entire 10 day course of antibiotics when treating strep throat, there is evidence that shorter courses of treatment may be sufficient for most cases of sinusitis. Amoxicillin is closely related to the parent compound penicillin and should not be prescribed in patients who are penicillin allergic.

Cephalosporins and Augmentin are considered broad-spectrum antibiotics because they have enhanced effectiveness against a wider range of bacteria, including those that are resistant to ordinary penicillin or amoxicillin. If the patient does not improve within the first week on amoxicillin, a change to Augmentin or to a cephalosporin such as Ceftin, Cefzil, Omnicef, or Suprax is reasonable. Although these drugs have a similar mechanism of action to penicillin, they generally can be taken in adequate doses once or twice daily. These medications should be used with extreme caution in patients with a history of penicillin allergy, as cross-reaction may occur.

Additional resources:

Common Antibiotics For Sinus Infections

Antibiotics may be prescribed when symptoms of a sinus infection warrant such treatment. Common antibiotics for sinus infection include:

  • Zithromax
  • Levaquin : Although this drug is often prescribed as a first line of therapy for sinusitis, it has serious side effects and should only be used as a last resort.

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Enhancing Healthcare Team Outcomes

Acute rhinosinusitis is among the most common primary care conditions. To avoid high morbidity, an interprofessional team should manage the disorder. The critical thing of which clinicians need to be aware is that most cases result from viruses and are self-limiting. As such, it is crucial to be able to identify the three cardinal symptoms for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. Clinicians should only prescribe antibiotics for the patient who exhibits prolonged symptoms without improvement for 10 days, double-worsening, or those with severe symptoms. Amoxicillin with or without clavulanate should be first-line therapy. Local antibiotic resistance factors, risk factors for antibiotic resistance, and the overall risk level of the patient should be a consideration. An infectious disease certified pharmacist can be a valuable resource, as they will often have the latest antibiogram data, can suggest antimicrobial alternatives if necessary, and check for drug interactions.

The opinions and assertions contained herein are the private views of the authors and are not to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of the Department of the Army, Department of the Air Force, Department of Defense, or the U.S. government.

Can You Get Rid Of A Sinus Infection Without Antibiotics

Antibiotics for sinus infection

Many sinus infections are caused by a virus like the common cold and do not require antibiotics for treatment. If you have mild symptoms, OTC medications may help relieve your symptoms until you feel better. However, consult your healthcare provider if symptoms worsen or do not improve after seven days, or if at any time you have intense/severe pain or pressure, or a high fever.

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Using The Right Water During Saline Rinses

When using saline nasal rinses, tap water should always be boiled and then allowed to cool to ensure cleanliness distilled water or premixed solutions could also be used instead of regular tap water.

Other home remedies for sinus infections include:

  • Drinking fluids: Drinking lots of fluids helps loosen and thin mucus. Avoid beverages that are caffeinated and alcoholic beverages that can dehydrate the body, which could thicken mucus.
  • Breathing steam: Warm water is best . You can breathe in steam from either a bowl or shower.
  • Humidifying the air: Use a cool air vaporizer or humidifier,particularly at night while sleeping.
  • Avoiding environmental substances: Avoid tobacco smoke and chlorinated water that can dry up the mucus membranes and exacerbate symptoms.
  • Implementing treatment measures: At the first sign of infection, use antihistamines and employ regular nasal rinses.

What Are Common Side Effects Of Sinus Infection Medications

The most common side effects of sinus infection medications differ by the type of medication you use. Decongestants tend to cause nervousness, insomnia, and a loss of appetite. Side effects of antibiotics include nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Antihistamines and steroids can cause dizziness and sleep disturbances.

This is not an exhaustive list of sinus infection medication side effects. If you experience any adverse reactions from a medication or treatment, its always best to consult with your healthcare provider.

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Will My Sinus Infection Clear Up On Its Own

The first few weeks of the common cold arent fun, but the acute sinusitis that can pop up afterwards doesnt help either. Sinus congestion and the common cold, unfortunately, go hand in hand. Acute sinusitis frequently is caused by the common cold, but also can be caused by allergies and bacterial and fungal infections.

Sinus infections are caused when the cavities around your nasal passages become inflamed and swollen, which eventually interferes with drainage and causes mucus to build up. This tends to get annoying, because it makes breathing through the nose difficult. It also affects the area around your eyes and face, and can cause a throbbing headache.

When a sinus infection hits, its always worse than what you remembered from the last time you had one. This may give you the idea that you need antibiotics, but most clear up without them. Antibiotics have no effect on viruses and arent recommended within the first week of developing a cold. About 70 percent of sinus infections go away within two weeks without antibiotics.

Consider these other forms of treatments instead of antibiotics:

  • Over-the-counter pain relievers. Aspirins, acetaminophen or ibuprofen can help relieve temporary pain.
  • Saline nasal spray. This is used to spray into your nose several times a day to rinse your nasal passages. They can help to prevent and treat inflammation.

Antibiotics only will be needed if the infection is severe, recurrent or persistent.

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What Is A Sinus Infection

Wellness Wednesday: Antibiotics for sinus infections?

The sinuses are cavities in the head that are filled with air. These air-filled pockets are lined with a very thin layer of mucus that functions to collect particles from the air that are breathed in, such as dust, germs, or other particles.

Very small hair-like projections function to sweep the mucus, along with any particles trapped inside of the mucus. The germ- or dirt-filled mucus then slides down the back of the throat and into the stomach where stomach acid works to kill any germs.

When a sinus infection occurs, this natural process involving mucus flow is blocked.

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Is There A Right Way To Blow Your Nose

If you have a stuffy nose, trying to force yourself to blow your nose could make it worse. The best thing to do is to blow one side of your nose at a time gently into a tissue. You might want to first use some type of nasal rinse to loosen any material in your nose before blowing. Make sure you dispose of the tissue and then clean your hands with soap and water or an antimicrobial sanitizer.

Case & Commentary: Part 2

Shortly after starting her second course of antibiotics, the patient began feeling unwell. A few days later, she was found down in her home by her daughter. The patient was brought to the emergency department for evaluation. Her work up revealed profound anemia due to brisk autoimmune hemolysis. This was thought to be due to the amoxicillin-clavulanate she had received. She was started on high-dose immunosuppressive therapy with steroids.

The chief population-level effect of antibiotic overuse is the widespread and growing problem of antimicrobial resistance . AMR is a worsening problem among many bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Escherichia coliorganisms that cause common clinical syndromes such as cellulitis, community-acquired pneumonia, and urinary tract infection. Once confined to hospitals, these drug-resistant pathogens are becoming increasingly prevalent in the community setting, and some data indicate that prior treatment with antibiotics may increase an individual patient’s likelihood of contracting an infection with a drug-resistant bacteria. AMR exerts significant societal costs, as infections with drug-resistant bacteria are associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and health care expenditures.

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Which Antibiotics Are Most Effective For Bacterial Sinusitis

Antibiotics are indicated for sinusitis that is thought to be bacterial, including sinusitis that is severe or involves the frontal, ethmoid, or sphenoid sinuses, since this type of sinusitis is more prone to complications. Penicillins, cephalosporins, and macrolides seem to be equally efficacious. A 5- to 10-day regimen of amoxicillin 500 mg 3 times a day is recommended as first-line therapy.

One study suggests that a single dose of 2 g of extended-release azithromycin may be more effective than a 10-day course of amoxicillin/clavulanate. However, azithromycin is not likely a good choice in sinusitis because symptoms may improve only because of the anti-inflammatory efficacy of the agent and because it has poor efficacy against S pneumoniae and H influenzae. The risk of adverse effects should be weighed against the severity of disease and patient comorbidities prior to initiating antibiotic treatment.

Patterns of bacterial resistance should also be taken into account in the choice of antibiotic.

References
  • Lucas JW, Schiller JS, Benson V. Summary health statistics for U.S. adults: National Health Interview Survey, 2001. Vital Health Stat 10. 2004 Jan. 1-134. .

  • Slavin RG, Spector SL, Bernstein IL, Kaliner MA, Kennedy DW, Virant FS, et al. The diagnosis and management of sinusitis: a practice parameter update. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2005 Dec. 116:S13-47. . .

  • Lusk RP, Stankiewicz JA. Pediatric rhinosinusitis. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1997 Sep. 117:S53-7. .

  • How Is Sinusitis Diagnosed

    Respiratory agents

    Symptoms of sinusitis mimic a cold in the early stages and diagnosis can be difficult. However, sinusitis tends to persist long after cold symptoms have resolved and symptoms can last for three weeks or more. Sinus infections are also more likely to cause symptoms such as facial or tooth pain, green nasal discharge, and fever.

    Your doctor will ask you about your symptoms and any history of illness leading up to this episode of sinusitis. The doctor will also perform a simple office examination and look into your ears, nose and throat, and take your temperature.

    Other examinations or procedures may be undertaken to rule out other conditions or if the diagnosis is uncertain.

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    What Are The Best Antibiotics For Sinus Infection Do Doctors Prescribe For You

    There are many antibiotics that your doctor or physician may prescribe to help treat your sinus infection. Some of these may even be familiar to you.

  • Ciprofloxacin This drug is used to treat conditions including urinary tract infections, specific types of infectious diarrhea, bone and joint infections, respiratory tract infections, typhoid, and other forms of bacterial infection.
  • Trimethoprim This drug is the brand name for a medication that is a combination of two antibiotics: trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole that is used to treat bacterial infections. Bactrim works by preventing the growth of bacteria.
  • These antibiotics are effective in treating sinus infection, however, these drugs do carry side effects. You should only be taken according to what your doctor or physician has prescribed. Always follow their instructions to achieve the best results.

    When Do We Need Antibiotics For Sinus Infection

    Antibiotics are not needed for many sinus infections, but your doctor can decide if you need an antibiotic. You doctor may recommend antibiotics if:

  • You have symptoms of a bacterial infection and you have not gotten better after 10 days, even with home treatment.
  • You have severe symptoms such as severe headache or facial pain, or you have other problems, such as pus forming in your sinus cavities.
  • You have had sinusitis for 12 weeks or longer .
  • You have a fever longer than 3-4 days.
  • Your symptoms get worse after initially improving.
  • Most sinus infections usually get better on their own without antibiotics. When antibiotics arent needed, they wont help you, and their side effects could still cause harm. Side effects can range from minor issues, like a rash, to very serious health problems, such as antibiotic-resistant infections and C. diff infection, which causes diarrhea that can lead to severe colon damage and death.

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    Case & Commentary: Part 1

    A healthy 53-year-old woman presented to her primary care physician with upper respiratory symptoms and possible sinusitis. She was prescribed Augmentin . Despite this therapy, her symptoms persisted. She was then prescribed azithromycin.

    Upper respiratory tract infection symptoms are among the most common presenting complaints to primary care physicians, with 83.1 million visits occurring in 2002 , of which 3.1 million were ultimately ascribed to acute sinusitis in adults. Sinusitis occurs after or in conjunction with a viral URI. Inflammation of the respiratory epithelium lining the paranasal sinuses leads to obstruction of the sinus ostia and accumulation of mucus within the sinuses. The adjacent nasal mucosa is invariably inflamed as well. This process leads to the typical sinus symptoms of headache, nasal congestion and discharge, and facial pain or pressure, sometimes accompanied by sneezing, toothache, or fever.

    Maxillary pain or tenderness in the face or teeth.

    Mucopurulent nasal discharge.

    Symptoms have lasted for 7 days or more.

    Despite these guidelines, overtreatment of acute sinusitis with antibiotics is common. A 2007 study found that antibiotics were prescribed in 82.7% of outpatient visits due to acute sinusitis. Many of these prescriptions are unnecessary, as the vast majority of cases of sinusitis are viral in originespecially when symptoms have lasted for less than 1 week.

    What Is Sinus Infection

    Whats the Difference Between Allergies, a Common Cold, and a Sinus Infection?

    Medically known as rhinosinusitis, Sinus infection or Sinusitis is an inflammation or swelling of the tissue lining the sinuses. Healthy sinuses are filled with air. But when they become blocked and filled with fluid, germs can grow and cause an infection. It occurs when your nasal cavities become infected, swollen, and inflamed. Sinusitis is usually caused by a virus and often persists even after other upper respiratory symptoms are gone. In some cases, bacteria, or rarely fungus, may cause a sinus infection.

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    Sinus Infection Antibiotics & Your Care

    SmartDocMD takes the approach of understanding that Antibiotics are not always the answer for treatment. We at SmartDocMD believe getting the RIGHT care at the RIGHT time is essential. The CDC Division of Infectious Disease has put together a chart that highlights whether or not antibiotics are needed for different diseases. You can view that chart by clicking on the previous link/article titled, Antibiotics Arent Always the Answer. As an informed patient, you should seek out doctors that do not overly prescribe antibiotics for sinus infection when it is unnecessary. We have a commitment to providing the best online doctor visit treatment.

    If youd like to speak to a doctor online, begin here on this website if you think you have a sinus infection that needs to be treated with antibiotics. SmartDocMD is the best virtual doctor option in the Golden State. We are currently looking to expand into other states, however at this time, we can offer online doctor visit times for California patients. If you think you have a sinus infection, or a common cold and are looking for online doctor prescriptions California, begin here. If you wish to take your care further, pay just $30 and youll receive personalized healthcare online with the best virtual doctor.

    Untreated Sinus Infection Risks

    Sinus infections often start to improve on their own after about 10 days. If your symptoms last longer without improving or if they worsen, a doctor may need to treat the underlying cause of the infection.

    If a sinus infection affects a sinus cavity close to the brain, it can spread to the brain if left untreated. Though rare, an infection can also pass into the eye socket and cause vision changes or blindness. These types of infections are more common in kids.

    While uncommon, a serious fungal sinus infection left untreated may pass into the bones.

    Make an appointment with a doctor if you have severe symptoms, or if the following symptoms last longer than 10 days or keep coming back:

    • fever
    • congestion
    • facial pain

    Because the cause of your sinus infection can affect your treatment options, its important to see a doctor for a diagnosis. The Healthline FindCare tool can provide options in your area if youre looking for a doctor.

    If you believe you have chronic or recurring sinusitis, consider asking for a referral to an otolaryngologist, also known as an ear, nose, and throat specialist. You may need imaging and other tests to determine the cause of your symptoms.

    An ENT specialist can take a culture of nose drainage to better understand the cause of an infection. The ENT specialist can also examine the sinuses more closely and look for any problem in the structure of the nasal passages that could lead to chronic sinus problems.

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