Monday, September 26, 2022

Doctor Won T Prescribe Antibiotics For Sinus Infection

What Is The Best Natural Antibiotic For Sinus Infection

Sinus Infection Antibiotics! Why won’t my doctor write a prescription?

Natural antibiotic options include antibacterial foods and plant-based remedies that can support the body in fighting the infection. But its important to note that adding antibacterial foods to your meal plan isnt an acceptable solution to clear up the infection. Instead, many patients focus on a combined approach of modern medicine and natural remedies at the same time.

Foods with antibacterial properties include:

  • Oregano oil

Antibiotics Are Not A Good First Choice For Sinus Infections

People often are quick to ask their doctor for an antibiotic prescription when they suffer from a bad flu or sinus infection. These infections can be annoying, with congested noses, headaches, pain all across the face and never-ending mucus. People just want to make the pain and discomfort go away and get on with their lives. Thats understandable, but antibiotics most likely wont better their situation, as has been shown in countless studies. This is because sinusitis, like most infections of the upper respiratory tract, are caused by viruses, not bacteria. And antibiotics only go after bacteria.

Actually, taking antibiotics can make you feel sicker, since your body is already weakened by the viral infection and now you expose it to the stress of antibiotics side effects. All antibiotics have side effects, so they should only be taken when it makes medical sense, such as when treating a bacterial infection.

More generally, you want to keep your antibiotics use at a minimum. Because the more you use antibiotics, the more likely you are to get ill in the upper respiratory tract in the future, as the antibiotics not just kill bad bacteria but also the good bacteria in your body that help protect your health.

It, therefore, is recommended not to immediately treat every sinus infections with antibiotics, but preserve them as heavy ammunition for the most severe cases.

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The Strongest Natural Antibiotic

I know it would be much simpler if I just told you which one of these natural antibiotics is the strongest, but unfortunately, it doesnt work like that.

We are different.

What works for one person may not work as well for the other. Youll have to try a few of them and see which one works for you best.

For me the most effective natural antibiotic is Oregano oil. I use it all the time.

Now that you have your complete list of natural antibiotics, you can safely treat your bacterial infections with the help of natures pharmacy without side effects, without harming your gut microflora, and without spending so much money on antibiotics.

But:

Before you use any of these top natural antibiotics, please consult your doctor to make sure they are safe for you, especially if you are taking any kind of medication.

What about you? Have you ever tried one of these natural antibiotics? Which one works best on your experience?

To your health and happiness,

Meital

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Viral Vs Bacterial Sinus Infections

Most sinus infections are caused by viruses that create inflammation in the sinuses, leading to blockage that can make it hard to breathe, nasal secretions, postnasal drip, and other discomfort like facial pain around your eyes, cheeks, nose, or forehead.

Knowing thisand that antibiotics dont work on viral infectionsmost healthcare providers first recommend treatments to relieve the symptoms of a sinus infection while you wait for it to resolve.

These may include:

  • Pain relievers like acetaminophen or ibuprofen to ease discomfort from swelling, fever, or sore throat

In rare cases, viral sinus infections can lead to bacterial growth in the nasal passages.

Theres no way to know for sure if you have a bacterial sinus infection without testing a mucus sample.

But even without a sample, two signs typically indicate a bacterial infection and may prompt your provider to prescribe antibiotics:

  • A sinus infection that lasts for more than 10 days
  • Symptoms of the infection resolve, then back worse a couple days later

Some people think yellow or green mucus may be a sign of a bacterial sinus infection, but colored mucus can occur with viral infections and does not necessarily mean you have a bacterial infection.

If you do have bacterial sinusitis , it should respond to antibiotics within a few days.

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How Long Does A Sinus Infection Last

Does Cold Medicine Work on Sinus Infections?

Sinus infections can last several days. Viral sinus infections are usually most severe three to six days after they start, and then begin to improve by day 10. A viral sinus infection can develop into a bacterial infection, which typically lasts longer than 10 days. Patients will usually respond to antibiotics within two to three days after a bacterial sinus infection is diagnosed and treated. After that, sinus infections can resolve anywhere between seven and 14 days.

There are three types of sinusitis. All three are based on length of symptoms:

  • Acute Sinusitis – symptoms last for less than four weeks
  • Subacute Sinusitis – symptoms last for four to 12 weeks
  • Chronic Sinusitis – symptoms last for more than 12 weeks
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    Can You Get Rid Of A Sinus Infection Without Antibiotics

    Many sinus infections are caused by a virus like the common cold and do not require antibiotics for treatment. If you have mild symptoms, OTC medications may help relieve your symptoms until you feel better. However, consult your healthcare provider if symptoms worsen or do not improve after seven days, or if at any time you have intense/severe pain or pressure, or a high fever.

    Most Sinus Infections Dont Require Antibiotics

    Ah, sinus infections. The New England Journal of Medicine published a clinical practice review of acute sinus infections in adults, that is, sinus infections of up to four weeks. The need for an updated review was likely spurred by the disconcerting fact that while the vast majority of acute sinus infections will improve or even clear on their own without antibiotics within one to two weeks, most end up being treated with antibiotics.

    It is this discrepancy that has clinical researchers and public health folks jumping up and down in alarm, because more unnecessary prescriptions for antibiotics mean more side effects and higher bacterial resistance rates. But on the other hand, while 85% of sinus infections improve or clear on their own, theres the 15% that do not. Potential complications are rare, but serious, and include brain infections, even abscesses.

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    Diagnosing And Treating A Sinus Infection Online

    Sinus infections are one of the most commonly treated conditions by Amwell physicians. Sinus infections are often mistaken for the common cold, but they are different conditions. While the two conditions are similar, the most likely symptoms for a sinus infection might include:

    • Thick, yellow, foul-smelling discharge from your nose
    • Pressure or pain around the eyes or cheeks
    • Cold like symptoms that won’t go away or get worse

    Many people think antibiotics are the number one treatment for sinus infections, but this is usually not the case. According to guidelines released by the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 90 to 98 percent of sinus infections aren’t caused by bacteria, meaning antibiotics will not work. Antibiotics are typically used to treat infections or diseases caused by bacteria. If your case of sinusitis is viral, antibiotics will be ineffective. In fact, antibiotics can be harmful to you if used inappropriately. Doctors can help determine if you have sinusitis, the type of sinusitis, if treatment is needed, or if a referral to a specialist is required.

    Once a diagnosis has been made, your doctor will go over the risks and benefits of the various treatment plans. Depending on the cause and severity of the infection, your treatment plan may include:

    • Home treatment options to help promote nasal drainage and ease symptoms i.e. salt water rinses
    • A recommendation of over the counter medications including:
    • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatories i.e. Ibuprofen

    Some Steps You Can Take

    Antibiotics not the answer for sinus infection: study

    Whether your sinus infection turns out to be viral or bacterial, you can help to ease your symptoms early on with supportive sinus care:

  • Use saline spray two to three times per day in each nostril.
  • Use a nasal decongestant such as Afrin®, but not longer than three days.
  • Drink eight 8-ounce glasses of fluid per day.
  • Get plenty of rest.
  • Take an over-the-counter anti-inflammatory, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen to help relieve the swelling of your sinuses.
  • If your symptoms arent improving after one week, its important to see your doctor. If a bacterial infection is suspected, youll probably need to take an antibiotic to clear up the infection and prevent further complications.

    If your infections occur more frequently, and your doctor really wants to establish if they are bacterial or viral, your Otolaryngologist or ear, nose and throat doctor can sample the snot from your nose when youre infected and send it to a laboratory to know for sure.

    Note: Antibiotics wont help a viral infection, and taking an antibiotic unnecessarily can do more harm than good. You risk possible side effects and increase your chances of developing antibiotic resistance, which can make future infections harder to treat, says Dr. Sindwani. So its important to wait and see how long your symptoms last.

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    But Sometimes Antibiotics For Sinus Infections Are Needed

    So how does one judge when it is appropriate to prescribe antibiotics for a sinus infection? There are several sets of official guidelines, which are all similar. When a patient has thick, colorful nasal discharge and/or facial pressure or pain for at least 10 days, they meet criteria for antibiotic treatment. If a patient has had those symptoms, but the symptoms seemed to start improving and then got worse again, then even if its been less than 10 days, they meet criteria for antibiotic treatment.

    The authors, however, also suggest that doctors discuss watchful waiting with patients and explain that most sinus infections clear up on their own in one to two weeks, and its a safe option to hold off on antibiotics. The symptoms can then be treated with a cocktail of over-the-counter medications and supportive care, like nasal saline irrigation, nasal steroid sprays, decongestants, and pain medications.

    Of course, many patients expect and demand antibiotics for sinus infections, and even those who are open to watchful waiting may hear about the rare but possible complications of things like, oh, brain abscess, and opt to treat.

    In the case of my patient above, she met criteria for treatment. She weighed the watchful waiting option against the potential risks of antibiotics for her sinus infection, and chose the prescription. I can tell you from very close follow-up that she improved quickly, though in truth, we will never really know if she would have gotten better anyway.

    Recommendations For Nonantimicrobial Therapy

    Intranasal steroids have not been conclusively shown to be of benefit in cases of acute sinusitis. One meta-analysis of 4 double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of intranasal corticosteroid treatment in acute rhinosinusitis supports its use as monotherapy or as an adjuvant therapy to antibiotics. However, a randomized, controlled trial of antibiotics and intranasal steroid showed no treatment benefit of intranasal steroids, either alone or with antibiotics.

    In a literature study, van Loon et al concluded that only limited evidence exists regarding the efficacy of intranasal corticosteroids in relieving the symptoms of recurrent acute rhinosinusitis. The best evidence, according to the investigators, came from a single study, which had a low bias risk but only moderate directness of evidence according to that report, intranasal corticosteroids may shorten the time needed to achieve symptom relief.

    No available data suggest that antihistamines are beneficial in acute sinusitis. In fact, antihistamines may cause harm by drying mucous membranes and decreasing clearance of secretions. Antihistamines are beneficial for reducing ostiomeatal obstruction in patients with allergies and acute sinusitis however, they are not recommended for routine use for patients with acute sinusitis. Antihistamines may complicate drainage by thickening and pooling sinonasal secretions.

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    Welcome To Silver Sinus

    Health care providers report nearly 32 million cases of chronic sinus infections to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention annually. Even more startling is that Americans spend $5.8 billion each year on health care costs related to sinus infection treatment.

    Most of this money is spent on doctor consultations and ultimately on the antibiotics that doctors like to prescribe. Unfortunately, antibiotics donât address the cause of most chronic sinusitis. This process leads to a frustrated consumer who is still suffering from the same chronic sinus infection symptoms that they had hoped to cure. If you have been through routine and are ready for a change, then read on.

    How Long Does Sinusitis Last

    After Reading This, You Wonât Prescribe The Wrong Antiviral Medication ...

    There are a few types of sinusitis, and doctors can classify them by how long they last. These classifications can include:

    Acute sinus infections with a four-week duration or less

    Subacute infections that last for roughly four to 12 weeks

    Chronic conditions that fall over 12 weeks

    Recurrent infections that recur many times throughout the year

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    Two Types Of Sinus Infections

    Lets differentiate between acute and chronic sinus infections. Acute sinus infections can last up to 4 weeks. If you are experiencing sinus infection symptoms for longer than 2 weeks, it doesnt mean you have a bad case of sinusitis this is normal. If you experience symptoms for longer than 4 weeks, this can be considered subacute anything that lasts longer than 12 weeks is considered chronic.

    Now, lets differentiate between bacteria and viruses. Either of the two can infect the body, and each warrants a different course of treatment. Bacterial infections require antibiotics, while viral infections do not they resolve themselves. All you can do in the latter case is to drink plenty of fluids, rest, and take decongestants. The majority of cases are viral, in which case your doctor cant prescribe you with anything other than decongestants.

    Antibiotic Choice Is Guided By Four Main Factors

    Our analysis of GP interviews and scientific publications revealed that antibiotic choice was guided by four main factors: the probable causal bacteria, the patients condition, antibiotic properties and general practitioner-related factors.

    Antibiotic choice is guided by the probable causal bacteria

    Almost all the GPs reported that they chose the antibiotic to prescribe according to the bacterium causing the infection . Identification of the causal bacterium is not easy in primary care, because GPs cannot necessarily perform bacterial tests during consultations. They therefore have to use the patients symptoms and epidemiological data to formulate hypotheses concerning the most likely causal bacterium . The GPs then choose an antibiotic to which they presume the bacterium is susceptible.

    Ex1 : The likely infecting organism was also reported as a major influence on which antibiotic to prescribe.

    Ex2: For otitis if there is also conjunctivitis, then I prescribe amoxicillin clavulanic-acid, because I suspect the pathogen to be Haemophilus influenzae.

    In some cases, GPs may decide to confirm their hypotheses, by prescribing bacteriological tests . However, as the results of these tests may take some time to obtain, GPs are nevertheless obliged to prescribe antibiotics in accordance with their hypothesis, before subsequent readjustment, if necessary, on the basis of bacteriological tests .

    Antibiotic choice is guided by the patients condition

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    When Antibiotics Dont Work

    Some patients suffer from recurring sinus infections. If your sinus infection does not improve within five to seven days after you finish the whole course of antibiotics, or if you experience another sinus infection within a few weeks, you may be referred to an Ear, Nose and Throat specialist for treatment.

    Other Options To Try Before Taking Sinus Infection Medications

    Treating sinusitis | Consumer Reports

    Besides inhaling steam to relieve pressure in your sinuses:

    • Keep yourself hydrated
    • Avoid irritants to your sinuses
    • Nasal irrigation

    Nasal irrigation, another treatment for sinus infections, means flushing out mucus and debris from the nose by pushing fluids through the nostrils. Some patients find this method uncomfortable, but overall more effective than simple steam.

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    Here Are 5 Things You Should Do If You Have A Virus

  • Rest. Rest is what your body needs so your immune system can have the energy it needs to fight the virus.
  • Eat healthy foods. We know that you may not have much of an appetite if you have a virus, but your body needs healthy food to give you the nutrients you need to stop the virus. Avoid the temptation to eat sugary comfort foods.
  • Hydrate. Its very important that you keep your fluid intake, even if you dont feel thirsty. Water and other fluids can help dilute your mucus secretions. Avoid alcoholic drinks and those with caffeine.
  • Alleviate some symptoms with medication. While antibiotics wont have any effect on a virus, there are some over-the-counter medications that may help ease your symptoms. Talk to us. Well be happy to give you information and suggestions.
  • Stay at home!This is the time to take one of your sick days. Dont go to work or school if you have a virus. Depending upon the type of illness you have, you may still be contagious. Your coworkers will appreciate your staying home. If that is not a possibility, speak to your supervisor about working remotely.
  • What The Treatment For Sinus Infections

    In order to eradicate the infection, youll need an antibiotic.

    Some people continue to experience a lingering sinus infection even after antibiotics. Sinuses are considered a closed cavity. Removing infection from a closed cavity can require more prolonged antibiotic usage compared to infections that occur in an open cavity .

    A sinus infection might require 2-4 weeks of antibiotics plus additional methods to encourage drainage of the sinuses. For a sinus infection to clear completely, we often recommend saline sprays, topical steroid sprays , and decongestants in addition to an antibiotic.

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